Louisville Stats

Member of the 24/7 Wall St. Media Network

Author: (page 1 of 3)

Wal-Mart is the Largest Employer in Kentucky

Most state economies are relatively diverse, yet it is not uncommon for a single industry to have an outsized impact on the state’s economy and labor market. In some cases, a single company employs a significant share of the state’s workforce. State governments tend to be the largest employers in each state. There are more […]

Kentucky Ranks 34th in Gender Equality

Wednesday, March 8 is International Women’s Day. Women and men around the world will celebrate in support of gender equality and equal opportunity for all. Some will participate in organized protests like A Day Without A Woman, and the International Women’s Strike. For many Americans, the election of Donald Trump represented a step back for […]

Kentucky Unemployment Improves in 2016

With 2016 unemployment rates of 2.7%, New Hampshire and South Dakota replaced North Dakota as the states with the lowest unemployment rates — the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported on Tuesday. New Mexico’s 6.7% unemployment rate is the highest in the country, pushing West Virginia and Nevada out of that position. National unemployment figures were […]

Kentucky Among the Worst States for Business

For 83 straight months, nearly seven years, the U.S. private sector has added jobs. Unemployment has steadily declined and remains close to a 10-year low. And with investors confident about the economy, the Dow Jones Industrial Average broke through the 20,000 mark early this year. By these and other key measures, business in the United […]

400 West Market is Kentucky’s Tallest Building

Mankind has always sought to rise above the clouds, but it was not until the late 19th century that the technology became available to make what we commonly call skyscrapers today possible. In 1884, construction on the Home Insurance Building in Chicago was completed. It was 12 stories tall, which is practically diminutive by today’s […]

Kentucky Has Added 61,600 Jobs Since the Great Recession

The U.S. economy has changed drastically in the past decade. As the housing bubble burst and the economy spiraled into the worst recession the country has faced since the Great Depression, unemployment hit a multi-decade high of 10% in 2009. Despite major setbacks, the U.S. economy began improving in June 2009, and many parts of […]

Kentucky is the 6th Least Healthy State

Progress in a society can be measured by steady improvement in health outcomes. The United States has made progress in some health areas over the years. Other health issues, however, have proven more challenging and some have even worsened considerably. Health outcomes differ widely across states, and the likelihood of living a healthy life largely […]

Kentucky is America’s 6th Worst Run State

Comparing the quality of governance between states can be challenging. The decisions state governors, legislators, city mayors and other elected officials make can have wide-reaching effects on state residents, and these decisions can sometimes take years to have an impact. Aware of these inherent challenges, 24/7 Wall St. has for seven straight years reviewed the […]

Why Quality of Life is Lower in Kentucky

Americans often evaluate their home states according to such subjective conditions as climate preference, the presence of friends and family, and personal history. In addition to these subjective measures, more objective socioeconomic factors also contribute to life satisfaction. It is such quantitative measures that can help assess the broader quality of life in a given […]

Why Students in Kentucky Graduate College With Less Debt

Total student debt in the United States, at approximately $1.26 trillion, is the second largest consumer debt in the country after mortgages. The average debt of all U.S. college undergraduates, including those who did not take any student loans, is around $16,929 per student, according to new data from student loan news website the Student […]

Older posts

© 2017 24/7 Wall St.

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑